The slogan “Above us, without us!” (Czech: O n`s bez n`s!) sums up the feelings of the Czechoslovakian population (Slovakia and the Czech Republic) towards the agreement. [Citation required] On its way to Germany, Czechoslovakia (as the state was renamed) lost its reasonable border with Germany and its fortifications. Without it, its independence became more nominal than more real. The agreement also caused Czechoslovakia to lose 70% of its steel industry, 70% of its electricity and 3.5 million citizens to Germany. [61] The Sudeten Germans celebrated what they saw as their liberation. The impending war, it seemed, had been averted. In the face of tensions between the Germans and the Czechoslovakian government, on 15 September 1938, Benes secretly proposed to cede 6,000 square kilometres to Czechoslovakia in Germany, in exchange for a German accession agreement of 1.5 to 2.0 million South Germans that expelled Czechoslovakia. Hitler did not respond. [13] The Munich quotation in foreign policy debates is also common in the 21st century.

[107] During negotiations on the Iran nuclear deal by Secretary of State John Kerry, a Republican representative from Texas called the negotiations “worse than Munich.” In a speech in France, Kerry himself referred to Munich for military action in Syria: “This is our munich moment.” [108] In December 1938, the Sudetenland was the pro-Nazi region of the Empire, with half a million Sudeten Germans members. Daladier was convinced that the agreement did not appease the Nazis and that disaster would still happen, while Chamberlain thought there was cause for celebration, mistakenly convinced that he had achieved peace. The day after the signing of the agreement, Germany took control of the Sudetenland. The Czechoslovakians did not take retaliatory measures. On March 15, 1939, Hitler occupied Bohemia and Moravia, and Czechoslovakia ceased to exist. The day before, Slovakia had become an autonomous state of Nazi puppets. Many Sudeten Germans acquired jobs in the protectorate or as Gestapo agents because they spoke fluent Czech. Northern Rhine, in the hope of independence, was taken over by Hungary.

During the Second World War, British Prime Minister Churchill, who opposed the agreement when it was signed, decided not to abide by the terms of the post-war agreement and to bring the Sudetenland back to post-war Czechoslovakia.

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